romansusan:

Slideshow tonight! 
Image above: Ignominy by Muhammad Habib Akram —> facebook.com/MuhammadHabibAkram
This is an ongoing series. If you have images for us to consider for our next installation, please send them to us via romansusan.org/slideshow-submissions. 

romansusan:

Slideshow tonight! 

Image above: Ignominy by Muhammad Habib Akram —> facebook.com/MuhammadHabibAkram


This is an ongoing series. If you have images for us to consider for our next installation, please send them to us via romansusan.org/slideshow-submissions

 

spacetravelco:

Scientific engravings from 1850

by John Philipps Emslie

(via the Wellcome Collection)

streetsick:

Green Fun: Instant Toys, Tricks, and Amusements Anyone Can Make from Common Weeds, Seeds, Leaves and Flowering Things by Maryanne Gjersvik, The Chatham Press, 1972

jtotheizzoe:

skunkbear:

A couple months ago I shared some GIFs of invisible things, and I finally got around to putting them together in this video:

When light travels through areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

Schlieren Flow Visualization can be used to visually capture these changes in density: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze … even sound.  Special thanks to Mike Hargather, a professor of mechanical engineering at New Mexico Tech, who kindly provided a lot of these videos.

I’m totally Schlieren right now. Amazing sights of sounds.

Pondering what it means, if anything, that three very influential makers/thinkers in my life were born and raised in Scotland: Norman McLaren, Ivor Cutler, and John Muir.

Perhaps all it means is destitute, grey, strict upbringings can produce wildly creative and passionate people.

(Source: cagedlions)

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